Tag Archives: Continuous integration

Oz object spaces in Esug 2013

Hi!

This little post is to add a summary of what I’ll be showing in the upcoming ESUG conference. I’ll present a paper about my work in the workshop and present the recovery tools of Oz in the innovation awards :).

For the paper

I’ll present the ideas and implementation of Oz object spaces. Especially the metacircular problems it solves, and a bit on the vision we (I and my supervisors have on this line of work). If you want to read the paper, you can go to:

http://rmod.lille.inria.fr/archives/papers/Poli13a-IWST13-ObjectSpacesVirtualization.pdf.

For the lazy, I paste here the abstract:

Reflective architectures are a powerful solution for code browsing, debugging or in-language process handling. However, these reflective architectures show some limitations in edge cases of self-modification and self-monitoring. Modifying the modifier process or monitoring the monitor process in a reflective system alters the system itself, leading to the impossibility to perform some of those tasks properly. In this paper we analyze the problems of reflective architectures in the context of image based object-oriented languages and solve them by providing a first-class representation of an image: a virtualized image.
We present Oz, our virtual image solution. In Oz, a virtual image is represented by an object space. Through an object space, an image can manipulate the internal structure and control the execution of other images. An Oz object space allows one to introspect and modify execution information such as processes, contexts, existing classes and objects. We show how Oz solves the edge cases of reflective architectures by adding a third participant, and thus, removing the selfmodification and self-observation constraints.

For the innovation awards

I’ve prepared a demo and with that I recorded a little video showing it. You can see it in:

Also, we have a sexy logo!

Oz logo

Oz logo, created by my friend Ximena Fernandez
Copyright (C) 2013 Ximena Fernandez

I asked my friend Ximena to make a logo for my projects, even pushing her with the deadline of ESUG 2013 (sorry xime ;), and she created this one, that I really like.

So, thanks again Xime!

Now, waiting for next week @ ESUG, to taste the ESUG beers ;).
Enjoy!
Guille

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The Bootstrap Chronicles Chapter 4 – Pump up with Fuel

Last time we were generating a new image with useful information.  This post tells the story after that first bootstrap: How we ensure that little monster is healthy, and how we ensure that our process is flexible and robust enough, and how does it help pharo in the modularization cruzade.

Fuel – The modularization sword

Probably some of you already know about Fuel: a fast object serializer written by Mariano Peck and Martín Dias. And maybe you are also aware of another Google Summer of Code Martín is working on: a Binary Package manager on top of fuel. Mariano showed us already a first proof of concept of that idea in this post: http://marianopeck.wordpress.com/2011/09/24/importing-and-exporting-packages-with-fuel/.

So, I want to work on building stuff on top of my little bootstrapped image.  And I thought Fuel was a nice gun to attack that problem.

Detecting illnesses

In my last post about the bootstrap I’ve already shown you how to get a list of broken/uninitialized stuff. That gives us an idea of how healthy our image is.  But there are other tools that we already use for that: tests.

So, Can we run SUnit on the bootstrap? Yes.

When I thought about Fuel and the bootstrap, I thought Fuel should be included by default, otherwise it should be difficult make it grow.  Of course I could’ve chosen the compiler for the same purpose.  But I’d like to enable modularization with binary packages.

So, what about exporting sunit as a binary package, and import it in the bootstrap? And what if we also export the tests over sunit, and include them also? Then we should be able to run the tests of sunit. Nice. Then this same idea can be applied to tests the kernel, or the compiler…

And I did it :)

Completeness (or “does it have all its essential parts?”)

Another thing we can think on is testing the completeness.  When should you consider that the bootstrap is complete? A fun definition could be “when it is able to define itself”. Ok, let’s export the bootstrapping code with fuel, and import it in the bootstrapped image, and let’s try to bootstrap from the bootstrap. And do it again, just for fun.

Once the bootstrap bootstrap was working, I put the tests to work on the last generation of bootstraps.

The results

I’ve created some Jobs to test all this stuff in the Ecole de Mines’ Jenkins.

The test results are exported in JUnit format, so we can tell what’s broken and look at the stack trace.  All this jobs are working on the bleeding edge of the project using latest Pharo image and latest CogVM.

Have Fun!

Guille